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Free Buddhist Audio

Work-Place Politics and Creativity

Fri, 21 Oct, 2011 - 00:00
Saddharaja gives a fourth talk in his new series on Right Livelihood Practice, this time focusing on the challenging theme of work-place politics. How do we work creatively with it?

After an overview of the dramatic Tudor dynasty of the English middle ages, he identifies the unpleasant components of work place politics, namely; rivalry, power-play and status, gossip and sexual scandal, and manipulation. He contrasts this with the Buddhist Right Livelihood aims, which are the opposite. Love Mode rather than Power Mode.

Saddharaja reminds us of the six realms of existence on the Tibetan Wheel of Life, and how these realms relate to work place politics. He reminds us of what the Buddha is offering in these realms - and how this can work for us.

Finally, he suggests three further creative practices for transforming work place politics, and finishes with a poem from William Blake.
Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Work-Place Politics and Creativity

Fri, 21 Oct, 2011 - 00:00
Saddharaja gives a fourth talk in his new series on Right Livelihood Practice, this time focusing on the challenging theme of work-place politics. How do we work creatively with it?

After an overview of the dramatic Tudor dynasty of the English middle ages, he identifies the unpleasant components of work place politics, namely; rivalry, power-play and status, gossip and sexual scandal, and manipulation. He contrasts this with the Buddhist Right Livelihood aims, which are the opposite. Love Mode rather than Power Mode.

Saddharaja reminds us of the six realms of existence on the Tibetan Wheel of Life, and how these realms relate to work place politics. He reminds us of what the Buddha is offering in these realms - and how this can work for us.

Finally, he suggests three further creative practices for transforming work place politics, and finishes with a poem from William Blake.

Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Work-Place Well-Being

Wed, 14 Sep, 2011 - 00:00
Here's another hour-long talk given at Uddiyana (the Windhorse;evolution HQ in Cambridge). It is the third of six talks on the theme of Right Livelihood. Saddharaja recounts a tourist trip into a copper and arsenic mine in Devon with his mother, and how appalling the working conditions would have been for the Victorian miners there. We learn the origins of the Cornish pasty. He expands on the terrible UK working conditions in Victorian times, e.g. children and pregnant women pulling coal trucks barefoot in mine shafts, men slogging in dangerous conditions for long hours and little pay. We learn about how Lord Shaftsbury, Robert Owen and others improved working conditions for the Victorian workforce.

Saddharaja relates all this to modern Right Livelihood and what our values are regarding working conditions in terms of: a) The Law. b) As human beings. c) As Buddhists. d) As a business. We take good working conditions for granted in the modern-day Western world.

He goes on to explore well-being issues for today's Buddhist workforce in the UK, along with the latest occupational health trends, e.g. stress, muscoskeletal disorders and chronic fatigue. He suggests that as individuals must take responsibility for our health. He suggests a two-fold approach of: a) growth and development, and b) Seeing Things As They Really Are. All this relates to the Wheel of Life and the Spiral Path, and may not be easy to do in our ever-changing, pressurised modern world.

He offers six ways we can each invest in our work-life well-being: Six Awarenesses: physical activity, perceived demand, lifestyle, food intake, body and purpose. He sees these as deep investments which will pay off in our spiritual lives in the long-term.

During the talk he gives interesting visual images and stories to illustrate his points. He finishes the talk with a reading from Tsong Khapa.
Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Work-Place Well-Being

Wed, 14 Sep, 2011 - 00:00
Here's another hour-long talk given at Uddiyana (the Windhorse;evolution HQ in Cambridge). It is the third of six talks on the theme of Right Livelihood. Saddharaja recounts a tourist trip into a copper and arsenic mine in Devon with his mother, and how appalling the working conditions would have been for the Victorian miners there. We learn the origins of the Cornish pasty. He expands on the terrible UK working conditions in Victorian times, e.g. children and pregnant women pulling coal trucks barefoot in mine shafts, men slogging in dangerous conditions for long hours and little pay. We learn about how Lord Shaftsbury, Robert Owen and others improved working conditions for the Victorian workforce.

Saddharaja relates all this to modern Right Livelihood and what our values are regarding working conditions in terms of: a) The Law. b) As human beings. c) As Buddhists. d) As a business. We take good working conditions for granted in the modern-day Western world.

He goes on to explore well-being issues for today's Buddhist workforce in the UK, along with the latest occupational health trends, e.g. stress, muscoskeletal disorders and chronic fatigue. He suggests that as individuals must take responsibility for our health. He suggests a two-fold approach of: a) growth and development, and b) Seeing Things As They Really Are. All this relates to the Wheel of Life and the Spiral Path, and may not be easy to do in our ever-changing, pressurised modern world.

He offers six ways we can each invest in our work-life well-being: Six Awarenesses: physical activity, perceived demand, lifestyle, food intake, body and purpose. He sees these as deep investments which will pay off in our spiritual lives in the long-term.

During the talk he gives interesting visual images and stories to illustrate his points. He finishes the talk with a reading from Tsong Khapa.

Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Dealing with Change

Sun, 5 Jun, 2011 - 00:00
Saddharaja starts off with another story from his childhood in the 1960s about a forest fire and the effects of this upon his father, who was a forester. An example of sudden, dramatic change at work.

He moves on to talk about smaller less dramatic changes in the work place which can create anxiety for Right Livelihood workers.

He defines what 'change' means and explores the meaning of the impermanence teaching (anicca), with the help of Sangharakshita's writings on the subject.

Saddharaja then moves on to explore our struggle to accept impermanence with our workplace, our attitudes to our jobs, and even our own bodies. He looks at both reactive and creative attitudes to change.

He finally moves on to suggesting 7 Habits of Highly Effective Right Livelihood Workers, which are essentially seven practices which we can use to creatively deal with change in our working lives, and as Buddhist practitioners.

He finally finishes with Rudyard Kiplings famous poem, If.....

Throughout the talk Saddharaja uses interesting examples from history to emphasise his points, e.g. Ned Lud and The Luddites, the painter Joseph Wright of Derby, and Charles Babbage and his Difference Engine.

Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Dealing with Change

Sun, 5 Jun, 2011 - 00:00
Saddharaja starts off with another story from his childhood in the 1960s about a forest fire and the effects of this upon his father, who was a forester. An example of sudden, dramatic change at work.

He moves on to talk about smaller less dramatic changes in the work place which can create anxiety for Right Livelihood workers.

He defines what 'change' means and explores the meaning of the impermanence teaching (anicca), with the help of Sangharakshita's writings on the subject.

Saddharaja then moves on to explore our struggle to accept impermanence with our workplace, our attitudes to our jobs, and even our own bodies. He looks at both reactive and creative attitudes to change.

He finally moves on to suggesting 7 Habits of Highly Effective Right Livelihood Workers, which are essentially seven practices which we can use to creatively deal with change in our working lives, and as Buddhist practitioners.

He finally finishes with Rudyard Kiplings famous poem, If.....

Throughout the talk Saddharaja uses interesting examples from history to emphasise his points, e.g. Ned Lud and The Luddites, the painter Joseph Wright of Derby, and Charles Babbage and his Difference Engine.
Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Meaningful Work and Values (The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work)

Wed, 18 May, 2011 - 00:00
Here's an hour-long talk from Saddharaja given at Uddiyana (the Windhorse:evolution HQ in Cambridge). The talk is the first of six talks on Right Livelihood in the modern world.

Saddharaja starts with a work story from his youth in the English Lake District and moves on to a recap of Sangharakshita's definitions of both Right Livelihood and Team-based Right Livelihood. He explores how most people in the modern world might find meaning in their work, with some help from the writings of Alain De Botton. He explores how Buddhists can make meaningful work a spiritual practice.

He suggests the use of shamatha and vipashyana approaches, and goes on to explore the 5 principles of Windhorse:evolution in that light. The talk finishes with a wonderful poem from Seamus Heaney on the joy of using a simple farm tool. The talk is peppered with Saddharaja's own work experiences, including a dramtic story involving a mine shaft in a Lake District slate quarry.

Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Meaningful Work and Values (The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work)

Wed, 18 May, 2011 - 00:00
Here's an hour-long talk from Saddharaja given at Uddiyana (the Windhorse:evolution HQ in Cambridge). The talk is the first of six talks on Right Livelihood in the modern world.

Saddharaja starts with a work story from his youth in the English Lake District and moves on to a recap of Sangharakshita's definitions of both Right Livelihood and Team-based Right Livelihood. He explores how most people in the modern world might find meaning in their work, with some help from the writings of Alain De Botton. He explores how Buddhists can make meaningful work a spiritual practice.

He suggests the use of shamatha and vipashyana approaches, and goes on to explore the 5 principles of Windhorse:evolution in that light. The talk finishes with a wonderful poem from Seamus Heaney on the joy of using a simple farm tool. The talk is peppered with Saddharaja's own work experiences, including a dramtic story involving a mine shaft in a Lake District slate quarry.