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Free Buddhist Audio

Taking Exactly What Appears As The Path

Mon, 23 Sep, 2013 - 01:00
Taking Exactly What Appears as The Path Talk given by Dharmachari Prasannavira at Windhorse:Evolution.
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Free Buddhist Audio

Taking Exactly What Appears As The Path

Mon, 23 Sep, 2013 - 00:00
Taking Exactly What Appears as The Path Talk given by Dharmachari Prasannavira at Windhorse:Evolution.
Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Right Realism, Money and the Game of Life

Thu, 4 Oct, 2012 - 01:00
Saddharaja talks about his impressions of visiting India and witnessing the rise of economic development of the sub-continent. He explores some history of the business relationship that has existed between India and the UK - over hundreds of years.

He goes on to explore the importance of personal money within the lives of Buddhists working in Right Livelihood, and asks the question: Is it possible to live without money today?

He focuses on extreme views that Right Livelihood workers can fall into with regards to their personal financial circumstances, and makes some suggestions about finding a 'Middle Way' approach to our money within the Right Livelihood context, which he dubs 'Right Realism'.

He identifies four kinds of financial situation that Right Livelihood workers are likely to inhabit, and makes six suggestions for developing Right Realism.

Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Right Realism, Money and the Game of Life

Thu, 4 Oct, 2012 - 00:00
Saddharaja talks about his impressions of visiting India and witnessing the rise of economic development of the sub-continent. He explores some history of the business relationship that has existed between India and the UK - over hundreds of years.

He goes on to explore the importance of personal money within the lives of Buddhists working in Right Livelihood, and asks the question: Is it possible to live without money today?

He focuses on extreme views that Right Livelihood workers can fall into with regards to their personal financial circumstances, and makes some suggestions about finding a 'Middle Way' approach to our money within the Right Livelihood context, which he dubs 'Right Realism'.

He identifies four kinds of financial situation that Right Livelihood workers are likely to inhabit, and makes six suggestions for developing Right Realism.
Windhorse Evolution's picture
Windhorse Evolution

The History of and Value in Team-Based Right Livelihood

Thu, 14 Jun, 2012 - 10:19
In his first visit to Windhorse: Evolution for several years Subhuti gives a rousing talk on some of the history behind team-based Right Livelihood within the Triratna Buddhist Movement.

He then goes on to explain why it is so important; because it represents an opportunity to live a ‘full’ Buddhist life for ourselves and present society with an alternative to consumerism and the myth of progress through buying a bigger TV

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Windhorse Evolution

Being an Individual Within a Collective Practice

Thu, 14 Jun, 2012 - 10:16
A talk by Parami given at Windhorse:Evolution. It’s good stuff too - her usual enthusiatic exploration of the earthy and ethereal details of everyday spiritual practice, especially within the framework of a sense of the ‘collective’. Some great and pretty funny stories from early, would-be-revolutionary experiments with co-operative working (“The opiate of the masses has arrived!”), and some wise words from her subsequent experience of trying to square the circle of dealing with one’s own individuality within a working sangha.
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Windhorse Evolution

Energy At Its Most Abundant

Thu, 14 Jun, 2012 - 10:13
Here’s a talk by Parami on ‘virya’ - ‘energy in pursuit of the good’, given at Windhorse:Evolution, a large and successful Buddhist team-based right livelihood business. But its concerns are certainly not parochial - a good, strong (sometimes even idealistic!) evocation of the co-operative spirit of Buddhist work and of spiritual practice in general, with particular reference to Shantideva’s ‘Bodhicharyavatara’. The Bodhisattvas descend, the Bodhichitta is called down, and Parami is off and rolling on her favourite subject… With a...
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Windhorse Evolution

Windhorse:evolution - Lessons Learnt

Thu, 14 Jun, 2012 - 10:07
Keturaja gives the sixth talk during Dharmapala college’s seminar on 40 years of the new society.
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Free Buddhist Audio

Right Craftsmanship and the God of Technology

Wed, 28 Mar, 2012 - 01:00
In this penultimate talk in the series, Saddharaja explores modern technology in the workplace, and the impact on Team-Based Right Livelihood practice.

There are so many benefits to changing technology - especially the internet, but what about the dark side? How do we deal with that? How can we turn our use of cutting-edge technology into a spiritual practice? Saddharaja explores the practice of discernment, and how to avoid the many well known pitfalls and distractions of the digital age.

He advocates we seek the Middle Way, and makes six suggestions which he terms 'Right Craftsmanship': 1) Upskilling and downskilling, 2) The value of awareness, 3) Talk to your friends, 4) Reflect on unsatisfactoriness and impermanence, 5) Buddhist worship not techno-worship, 6) Time away from technology.

He peppers the talk with stories, visual images and finally ends with a beautiful poem from Ryokan.

Free Buddhist Audio's picture
Free Buddhist Audio

Right Craftsmanship and the God of Technology

Wed, 28 Mar, 2012 - 00:00
In this penultimate talk in the series, Saddharaja explores modern technology in the workplace, and the impact on Team-Based Right Livelihood practice.

There are so many benefits to changing technology - especially the internet, but what about the dark side? How do we deal with that? How can we turn our use of cutting-edge technology into a spiritual practice? Saddharaja explores the practice of discernment, and how to avoid the many well known pitfalls and distractions of the digital age.

He advocates we seek the Middle Way, and makes six suggestions which he terms 'Right Craftsmanship': 1) Upskilling and downskilling, 2) The value of awareness, 3) Talk to your friends, 4) Reflect on unsatisfactoriness and impermanence, 5) Buddhist worship not techno-worship, 6) Time away from technology.

He peppers the talk with stories, visual images and finally ends with a beautiful poem from Ryokan.