Turning Arrows Into Flowers

A seven-point mind training
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Turning Arrows Into Flowers

A seven-point mind training
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Day 1    Day 2    Day 3    Day 4  

Day 5    Day 6    Day 7

What is a Home Retreat? (click to read)

Home Retreats can be tailored to your needs during the lockdown.

We provide:

  • Daily, specially recorded teachings
  • Related Dharma resources
  • Support, perspective and inspiration all week long from our team on the Community Toolkit.
  • Live Home Retreat events
  • And a chance to connect with the retreat leader to ask questions about your practice.

Whether you have the time to engage with a full-on, urban-retreat style week at home – or are super occupied already with kids or work and just want some useful structure to book-end your days with a little calm and inspiration: this is for you.

A mythic image to sum up and symbolize the theme of this week is that of the Buddha on the cusp of his Enlightenment. He is sitting still at the point when Mara attacks him with all the weapons he can muster. But, as the story goes, even though the Buddha is attacked he does not react with anger, hatred or defensiveness. Instead he sits in complete peace and openness; the arrows from his opponents drift and float down around him as flower petals.

Yashobodhi is our guide to the practice this week. She brings a great warmth and beautifully inquiring mind to bear on the material. Her focus is on a state of openness, of non-defensiveness, of having a mind that is free of blame and reactivity. Instead we practice to turn toward the challenge with openness, kindness and interest, developing an attitude of ‘taking adversity onto the path’. Then we can use it to transform ourselves – and take our place at the heart of stillness.

🎧 Listen to a special podcast episode introducing the retreat

🧘🏽‍♀️ 🧘🏽‍♂️ Download a guided Tonglen meditation practice by Yashobodhi.

🧘🏽‍♀️ 🧘🏽‍♂️ Join us for meditation every week day

🤝 Connect with others taking part on the Community Toolkit space!

What is a Home Retreat? (tap to read)

Home Retreats can be tailored to your needs during the lockdown.

We provide:

  • Daily, specially recorded teachings
  • Related Dharma resources
  • Support, perspective and inspiration all week long from our team on the Community Toolkit.
  • Live Home Retreat events
  • And a chance to connect with the retreat leader to ask questions about your practice.

Whether you have the time to engage with a full-on, urban-retreat style week at home – or are super occupied already with kids or work and just want some useful structure to book-end your days with a little calm and inspiration: this is for you.

A mythic image to sum up and symbolize the theme of this week is that of the Buddha on the cusp of his Enlightenment. He is sitting still at the point when Mara attacks him with all the weapons he can muster. But, as the story goes, even though the Buddha is attacked he does not react with anger, hatred or defensiveness. Instead he sits in complete peace and openness; the arrows from his opponents drift and float down around him as flower petals.

Yashobodhi is our guide to the practice this week. She brings a great warmth and beautifully inquiring mind to bear on the material. Her focus is on a state of openness, of non-defensiveness, of having a mind that is free of blame and reactivity. Instead we practice to turn toward the challenge with openness, kindness and interest, developing an attitude of ‘taking adversity onto the path’. Then we can use it to transform ourselves – and take our place at the heart of stillness.

🎧 Listen to a special podcast episode introducing the retreat

🧘🏽‍♀️ 🧘🏽‍♂️ Download a guided Tonglen meditation practice by Yashobodhi.

🧘🏽‍♀️ 🧘🏽‍♂️ Join us for meditation every week day

🤝 Connect with others taking part on the Community Toolkit space!

 


Day 1: Introducing Seven-point Mind Training and The Four Reminders

Introducing today's practice and further resources

Here we get an encouraging introduction to what the seven-point mind training has to offer anyone interested in learning to work more effectively to lessen suffering (our own and other people’s). Yashobodhi’s experience with this material shines through – as does the practical joy of engaging in this way.

A lovely, down-to-earth guide to helping us get started – with a look at the preliminary practices and the “Four Reminders” as the first point to consider.

To help you engage more fully with the week it is worth spending a bit of time reflecting on what you would like to get out of it and then make a clear and realistic intention for the week. This will help you stay focused when life becomes busy or your motivation starts flagging!

It can be useful to think in terms of a general vision, then breaking it down into achievable targets (such as meditating every day, checking in with a friend etc) but also considering things that are likely to prevent you from sticking to your intention – and what you can do to prevent this.
A little bit of ritual can also be helpful to set the scene – and tune you into your vision.

Read the dedication ceremony

Listen to the dedication ceremony

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Prajnaketu, from sunny Oxford, UK, shares his thoughts on the teaching of the Four Reminders: our precious human birth, death and impermanence, karma and rebirth, and the defects of samsara…

Read today’s welcome to the retreat, with suggestions for getting started.

Try a Dedication Ceremony to get things going!

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit


Day 1: Introducing Seven-point Mind Training and The Four Reminders

Introducing today's practice and further resources (tap to read)

Here we get an encouraging introduction to what the seven-point mind training has to offer anyone interested in learning to work more effectively to lessen suffering (our own and other people’s). Yashobodhi’s experience with this material shines through – as does the practical joy of engaging in this way.

A lovely, down-to-earth guide to helping us get started – with a look at the preliminary practices and the “Four Reminders” as the first point to consider.

To help you engage more fully with the week it is worth spending a bit of time reflecting on what you would like to get out of it and then make a clear and realistic intention for the week. This will help you stay focused when life becomes busy or your motivation starts flagging!

It can be useful to think in terms of a general vision, then breaking it down into achievable targets (such as meditating every day, checking in with a friend etc) but also considering things that are likely to prevent you from sticking to your intention – and what you can do to prevent this.
A little bit of ritual can also be helpful to set the scene – and tune you into your vision.

Read the dedication ceremony

Listen to the dedication ceremony

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Prajnaketu, from sunny Oxford, UK, shares his thoughts on the teaching of the Four Reminders: our precious human birth, death and impermanence, karma and rebirth, and the defects of samsara…

Read today’s welcome to the retreat, with suggestions for getting started.

Try a Dedication Ceremony to get things going!

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit


Day 2: What is the Bodhichitta?

Introducing today's practice and further resources

For Day 2, here are three teachings giving us a great 360º overview of the Bodhichitta (the deep, realised wish for all to attain liberation of heart and mind) in Buddhist tradition. Most importantly, we discover its relevance to everyday practice in the crucial work of learning to work with our minds and becoming a happier person.

After a general introduction, Yashobodhi draws out the “absolute” aspect of this work, examining how reflection on insubstantiality – that nothing can be truly said to have an irreducible essence – is a gateway to freedom when undertaken in the right conditions.

She then explores the “relative” aspect of this same work where the focus in on compassion practice – for ourselves and for all beings. This essential insight work is located within the Tonglen (“sending and receiving via the breath”) meditation, to which we are also introduced.

Returning to the image of the the Buddha when Mara attacks him with all the weapons he can muster: the Buddha sits in complete peace and openness; the arrows from his opponents drift down around him as flower petals. So you may wish to dwell with that image while chanting the mantra of the historical Buddha – the Shakyamuni mantra. 

Here is a selection of versions for you to listen to: the Shakyamuni mantra

Join us on Saturday May 23 for a live Tonglen meditation with Yashobodhi

Listen to some talks on the Four Reminders

Listen to Eight Verses for Training the Mind

01 What is the Bodhichitta?
03 Training in Relative Bodhichitta

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Simharava in Berlin, Germany, talks about how she is trying to help alleviate suffering at the moment. And, in particular, shares her thoughts on the Buddhist figure of the Avalokiteshvara – associated with Great Compassion – who holds the wish-fulfilling jewel to his heart.

Read ‘The Heart-Mind Oriented Towards Compassion’

Extra Resource – Dhammadinna on Mind Training

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit


Day 2: What is the Bodhichitta?

Introducing today's practice and further resources (tap to read)

For Day 2, here are three teachings giving us a great 360º overview of the Bodhichitta (the deep, realised wish for all to attain liberation of heart and mind) in Buddhist tradition. Most importantly, we discover its relevance to everyday practice in the crucial work of learning to work with our minds and becoming a happier person.

After a general introduction, Yashobodhi draws out the “absolute” aspect of this work, examining how reflection on insubstantiality – that nothing can be truly said to have an irreducible essence – is a gateway to freedom when undertaken in the right conditions.

She then explores the “relative” aspect of this same work where the focus in on compassion practice – for ourselves and for all beings. This essential insight work is located within the Tonglen (“sending and receiving via the breath”) meditation, to which we are also introduced.

Returning to the image of the the Buddha when Mara attacks him with all the weapons he can muster: the Buddha sits in complete peace and openness; the arrows from his opponents drift down around him as flower petals. So you may wish to dwell with that image while chanting the mantra of the historical Buddha – the Shakyamuni mantra. 

Here is a selection of versions for you to listen to: the Shakyamuni mantra

Join us on Saturday May 23 for a live Tonglen meditation with Yashobodhi

Listen to some talks on the Four Reminders

Listen to Eight Verses for Training the Mind

 

01 What is the Bodhichitta?
02 Training in Absolute Bodhichitta
03 Training in Relative Bodhichitta

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Simharava in Berlin, Germany, talks about how she is trying to help alleviate suffering at the moment. And, in particular, shares her thoughts on the Buddhist figure of the Avalokiteshvara – associated with Great Compassion – who holds the wish-fulfilling jewel to his heart.

Read ‘The Heart-Mind Oriented Towards Compassion’

Extra Resource – Dhammadinna on Mind Training

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit


Day 3: Transforming Adversity into Awakening

Introducing today's practice and further resources

Day 3 and point 3 brings us to the great challenge of what to do when things go wrong in life: how to respond in a way that supports greater peace of heart and mind; how to overcome suffering and use its energy for transformative good, particularly by moving away from a strategy of blaming ourselves or others that always fails to set us free.

The third day on any retreat is often when difficulties or distractions start to arise! This is a good point to tune in again with your resolution you made at the beginning of the week and recommit yourself to the vision you have for the week. You may wish to mark your resolve by doing a puja (devotional ritual).

If you are new to puja here are some talks introducing the practice

Here is the text for the Threefold Puja

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Garavavati, living in a women’s residential Buddhist community in London, UK, shares her reflections around this slogan, particularly the choice we have between the limiting restrictions of experiencing blame and the freedom in choosing to take responsibility for our own minds.

Read ‘Transforming adversity into awakening’

Read ‘Threefold puja’

Listen to ‘Chanting for the Buddha’ – a talk on ritual by Bodhilila

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 3: Transforming Adversity into Awakening

Introducing today's practice and further resources (tap to read)

Day 3 and point 3 brings us to the great challenge of what to do when things go wrong in life: how to respond in a way that supports greater peace of heart and mind; how to overcome suffering and use its energy for transformative good, particularly by moving away from a strategy of blaming ourselves or others that always fails to set us free.

The third day on any retreat is often when difficulties or distractions start to arise! This is a good point to tune in again with your resolution you made at the beginning of the week and recommit yourself to the vision you have for the week. You may wish to mark your resolve by doing a puja (devotional ritual).

If you are new to puja here are some talks introducing the practice

Here is the text for the Threefold Puja

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Garavavati, living in a women’s residential Buddhist community in London, UK, shares her reflections around this slogan, particularly the choice we have between the limiting restrictions of experiencing blame and the freedom in choosing to take responsibility for our own minds.

Read ‘Transforming adversity into awakening’

Read ‘Threefold puja’

Listen to ‘Chanting for the Buddha’ – a talk on ritual by Bodhilila

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 4: Making our Whole life a Life of Practice

Introducing today's practice and further resources

Day 4, point 4 of our practice week looks at what it means to integrate this kind of mind training work into every area of our lives using reflection on 5 forces (or “powers”). Yashobodhi also movingly evokes the relevance of such deep Dharma activity to the process of our own (and other people’s) death…

Today you could try and do more meditation – perhaps an extra sit (even if for a few minutes) – but also focus on bringing your practice off the cushions. This could involve chanting the Refuges and Precepts at the beginning of your day and being more conscious to behave ethically throughout your day, introducing a mindfulness bell (a random bell you set on your phone that you use to remind yourself to come back to your intention for the week), be more generous etc. Try to see that your whole day – work, meals, commuting – is part of your Dharma life.

Listen to the Refuges and Precepts being chanted

 

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Dhammakumara, from the UK, but currently based in Sydney, Australia, is in conversation with Prajnaketu. He talks about how he’s been making his life a life of practice during the lockdown. Touching on responding to fear and overwhelm, and coming back to the practice of just being with his current experience; whether that’s drinking coffee or reading the news…

Read ‘Making Our Whole Life a Life of Practice’

Read ‘Refuges and Precepts’

Listen to ‘Chandrabodhi chanting the Refuges and Precepts (Indian Style)

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 4: Making our Whole life a Life of Practice

Introducing today's practice and further resources (tap to read)

Day 4, point 4 of our practice week looks at what it means to integrate this kind of mind training work into every area of our lives using reflection on 5 forces (or “powers”). Yashobodhi also movingly evokes the relevance of such deep Dharma activity to the process of our own (and other people’s) death…

Today you could try and do more meditation – perhaps an extra sit (even if for a few minutes) – but also focus on bringing your practice off the cushions. This could involve chanting the Refuges and Precepts at the beginning of your day and being more conscious to behave ethically throughout your day, introducing a mindfulness bell (a random bell you set on your phone that you use to remind yourself to come back to your intention for the week), be more generous etc. Try to see that your whole day – work, meals, commuting – is part of your Dharma life.

Listen to the Refuges and Precepts being chanted

 

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Dhammakumara, from the UK, but currently based in Sydney, Australia, is in conversation with Prajnaketu. He talks about how he’s been making his life a life of practice during the lockdown. Touching on responding to fear and overwhelm, and coming back to the practice of just being with his current experience; whether that’s drinking coffee or reading the news…

Read ‘Making Our Whole Life a Life of Practice’

Read ‘Refuges and Precepts’

Listen to ‘Chandrabodhi chanting the Refuges and Precepts (Indian Style)

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 5: How do we know this is working?

Introducing today's practice and further resources

Day 5 revolves around evaluating the mind-training practice we’ve been engaged in all week. This is essential on any spiritual path, with any kind of method or doctrine, and Yashobodhi provides a clear set of questions to ask ourselves in checking out that the things we’re doing are actually helping! The sense of agency and confidence we can gain from owning the practice in this way is a strong alternative for the routine, everyday kind of ego-clinging that can so often hold us back.

You could make a bit of time to reflect on your day and where the seven-point mind turning reflection could be (or has been) of use. You could do some journalling or simply tell a friend.

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Prajnahridaya, living at Padmaloka retreat centre in Norfolk, UK, shares his reflections around this slogan, reflecting on the essence of the Mind Training teachings – a release from ego clinging.

⁣⁣⁣He reflects on the dangers of trying to get rid of something and focuses instead on the freedom, inspiration and beauty that can arise when we let go of clinging.

Read ‘How Do We Know This Is Working’

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 5: How do we know this is working?

Introducing today's practice and further resources (tap to read)

Day 5 revolves around evaluating the mind-training practice we’ve been engaged in all week. This is essential on any spiritual path, with any kind of method or doctrine, and Yashobodhi provides a clear set of questions to ask ourselves in checking out that the things we’re doing are actually helping! The sense of agency and confidence we can gain from owning the practice in this way is a strong alternative for the routine, everyday kind of ego-clinging that can so often hold us back.

You could make a bit of time to reflect on your day and where the seven-point mind turning reflection could be (or has been) of use. You could do some journalling or simply tell a friend.

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Today, Prajnahridaya, living at Padmaloka retreat centre in Norfolk, UK, shares his reflections around this slogan, reflecting on the essence of the Mind Training teachings – a release from ego clinging.

⁣⁣⁣He reflects on the dangers of trying to get rid of something and focuses instead on the freedom, inspiration and beauty that can arise when we let go of clinging.

Read ‘How Do We Know This Is Working’

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 6: What Are We Committed to?

Introducing today's practice and further resources

The big questions keep coming as we move deep into our week of shared practice around the seven point mind-training. What are we “bonded” to? How do we see our ethical path? How do we envision making commitments to ourselves and the promises we make? Yashobodhi offers some lojong (“teaching slogans”) that can help us clarify what it is, exactly, we are up to!

Again ritual often has the magical properties of poetry or art: it can speak to parts of your experience that concepts do not reach. You may like to make time to do a longer puja (a Buddhist ritual) – the Sevenfold Puja.

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Here’s a delightful conversation between friends: Akasajoti, based in London, UK and the recently ordained Varadhi, in Melbourne, Australia!

Akasajoti and Varadhi explore their favourite mind-training slogans – ‘of the two witnesses, hold the principal one’ and ‘liberate yourself by examining and analysing’ – looking at how empowering it can be to bring greater honesty and self-awareness into their lives.

The big questions keep coming as we move deep into our week of shared practice around the seven point mind-training. What are we “bonded” to? How do we see our ethical path? How do we envision making commitments to ourselves and the promises we make? These lojong (“teaching slogans”) can help us clarify what it is, exactly, we are up to!

Remembering that we can dedicate our practice to all living beings you may wish to finish your day with a ritual of Transference of Merit and Self-Surrender (the last section in the Sevenfold Puja).

Read ‘What Are We Committed To?’

Read about the ‘Sevenfold Puja’

Download the text of the Sevenfold Puja

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 6: What Are We Committed to?

Introducing today's practice and further resources (tap to read)

The big questions keep coming as we move deep into our week of shared practice around the seven point mind-training. What are we “bonded” to? How do we see our ethical path? How do we envision making commitments to ourselves and the promises we make? Yashobodhi offers some lojong (“teaching slogans”) that can help us clarify what it is, exactly, we are up to!

Again ritual often has the magical properties of poetry or art: it can speak to parts of your experience that concepts do not reach. You may like to make time to do a longer puja (a Buddhist ritual) – the Sevenfold Puja.

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

Here’s a delightful conversation between friends: Akasajoti, based in London, UK and the recently ordained Varadhi, in Melbourne, Australia!

Akasajoti and Varadhi explore their favourite mind-training slogans – ‘of the two witnesses, hold the principal one’ and ‘liberate yourself by examining and analysing’ – looking at how empowering it can be to bring greater honesty and self-awareness into their lives.

The big questions keep coming as we move deep into our week of shared practice around the seven point mind-training. What are we “bonded” to? How do we see our ethical path? How do we envision making commitments to ourselves and the promises we make? These lojong (“teaching slogans”) can help us clarify what it is, exactly, we are up to!

Remembering that we can dedicate our practice to all living beings you may wish to finish your day with a ritual of Transference of Merit and Self-Surrender (the last section in the Sevenfold Puja).

Read ‘What Are We Committed To?’

Read about the ‘Sevenfold Puja’

Download the text of the Sevenfold Puja

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 7: Guides to What Actually works (and Concluding Thoughts)

Introducing today's practice and further resources

We’ve come to the end of our week together looking at training the mind to greater happiness using new ways of engaging with our experience in the world. To gather the threads of the practice together Yashobodhi reflects on some key, pithy lojong reminders that capture the great efficacy and delight of this work – and which we can carry with us well beyond these days with confidence.

“Set your goal – make use
of every day and night to achieve it!”

It is always useful to dwell on any benefits you have received from the week. Perhaps you would like to make a few changes to your life – such as less time checking your emails; or ‘doing nothing’ for ten minutes each day. You may wish to write these down and keep them by your bed or on your fridge as a reminder. Telling other people can also be helpful – so they can remind you if you forget!

Remembering that we can dedicate our practice to all living beings you may wish to finish the week with a ritual of Transference of Merit and Self-Surrender (the last section in the Sevenfold Puja)

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

We’ve come to the end of our week together looking at training the mind to greater happiness using new ways of engaging with our experience in the world. To gather the threads of the practice together Yashobodhi reflects on some key, pithy lojong reminders that capture the great efficacy and delight of this work – and which we can carry with us well beyond these days with confidence.

It is always useful to dwell on any benefits you have received from a retreat. Perhaps you would like to make a few changes to your life – such as less time checking your emails; or ‘doing nothing’ for ten minutes each day. You may wish to write these down and keep them by your bed or on your fridge as a reminder. Telling other people can also be helpful – so they can remind you if you forget!

Remembering that we can dedicate our practice to all living beings you may wish to finish the week with a ritual of Transference of Merit and Self-Surrender (the last section in the Sevenfold Puja)

“Set your goal – make use of every day and night to achieve it!”

Download the text of the Sevenfold Puja

Get post-retreat resources and a recommended reading list

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

Day 7: Guides to What Actually works (and Concluding Thoughts)

Introducing today's practice and further resources (tap to read)

We’ve come to the end of our week together looking at training the mind to greater happiness using new ways of engaging with our experience in the world. To gather the threads of the practice together Yashobodhi reflects on some key, pithy lojong reminders that capture the great efficacy and delight of this work – and which we can carry with us well beyond these days with confidence.

“Set your goal – make use
of every day and night to achieve it!”

It is always useful to dwell on any benefits you have received from the week. Perhaps you would like to make a few changes to your life – such as less time checking your emails; or ‘doing nothing’ for ten minutes each day. You may wish to write these down and keep them by your bed or on your fridge as a reminder. Telling other people can also be helpful – so they can remind you if you forget!

Remembering that we can dedicate our practice to all living beings you may wish to finish the week with a ritual of Transference of Merit and Self-Surrender (the last section in the Sevenfold Puja)

 

community toolkit resources

We’ll be blogging through the week to support your practice!

Join the Community Toolkit

Connect with others using this space for a Home Retreat.

We’ve come to the end of our week together looking at training the mind to greater happiness using new ways of engaging with our experience in the world. To gather the threads of the practice together Yashobodhi reflects on some key, pithy lojong reminders that capture the great efficacy and delight of this work – and which we can carry with us well beyond these days with confidence.

It is always useful to dwell on any benefits you have received from a retreat. Perhaps you would like to make a few changes to your life – such as less time checking your emails; or ‘doing nothing’ for ten minutes each day. You may wish to write these down and keep them by your bed or on your fridge as a reminder. Telling other people can also be helpful – so they can remind you if you forget!

Remembering that we can dedicate our practice to all living beings you may wish to finish the week with a ritual of Transference of Merit and Self-Surrender (the last section in the Sevenfold Puja)

“Set your goal – make use of every day and night to achieve it!”

Download the text of the Sevenfold Puja

Get post-retreat resources and a recommended reading list

See all posts for this retreat from the Community Toolkit

With deep thanks to Yashobodhi for her generosity in providing the resources for this course.

A big thank you to Aloka for making his black & white line drawing available for us to use on this retreat.

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