Online Meditators

Meditations from the Anuruddha Sutta - Week 4, Deeper Into The Breath

On Mon, 27 July, 2015 - 14:49
Candradasa's picture
Candradasa

This Tuesday we continue our six week series of meditations based on the Anuruddha Sutta and the Buddha’s description of how the qualities of a Dharma farer relate to the practices they engage in - especially in meditation itself.

Tuesday 28th July, 2.30pm EST / 7.30pm UK

Add us to your circles on Google + and join the Hangout. We’ll be online 10 minutes before and we’ll sit for about 40 minutes, with an introduction and space for optional discussion afterwards. 

NB. Tuesday meditations are primarily for those who know the two main practices we focus on. Fridays are drop-in meditations (beginners welcome!).

If you join the meditation late, please mute your microphone to avoid disturbing others. 

This Dhamma is for one whose mindfulness is established, not for one whose mindfulness is confused.’ Thus was it said. With reference to what was it said? There is the case where a person is mindful, highly meticulous, remembering & able to call to mind even things that were done & said long ago. ‘This Dhamma is for one whose mindfulness is established, not for one whose mindfulness is confused.’ Thus was it said. And with reference to this was it said.

This Dhamma is for one whose mind is centered, not for one whose mind is uncentered.’ Thus was it said. With reference to what was it said? There is the case where a person, quite withdrawn from sensuality, withdrawn from unskillful mental qualities, enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born from withdrawal, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. With the stilling of directed thoughts & evaluations, they enter & remain in the second jhana: rapture & pleasure born of composure, unification of awareness free from directed thought & evaluation — internal assurance. With the fading of rapture, they remain equanimous, mindful, & alert, and sense pleasure with the body. They enter & remain in the third jhana, of which the Noble Ones declare, ‘Equanimous & mindful, they have a pleasant abiding.’ With the abandoning of pleasure & pain — as with the earlier disappearance of elation & distress — they enter & remain in the fourth jhana: purity of equanimity & mindfulness, neither pleasure nor pain. ‘This Dhamma is for one whose mind is centered, not for one whose mind is uncentered.’ Thus was it said. And with reference to this was it said.

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