Helen - Windhorse Publications's picture
Helen - Windhor...

Announcing our new books for 2020

From Windhorse Publications on Thu, 5 Dec, 2019 - 16:39

Announcing our new books for 2020

From Windhorse Publications on Thu, 5 Dec, 2019 - 16:39

We’re thrilled to announce the first six of the new books we’ll be publishing in 2020. Three of them are now available for sponsorship.
Why sponsor a book?
Publishing in the 21st century is all about adapting to challenging conditions, with lower profits from online sales and increased competition from digital formats. At Windhorse Publications we are meeting this challenge, but we increasingly need start-up funding for a book’s production and marketing. You can help us by choosing to sponsor...

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Sadayasihi's picture
Sadayasihi

Dharmabyte: Cultivating A Mind of Faith

From Free Buddhist Audio on Thu, 28 Nov, 2019 - 14:00

Suryagupta shares the story of Shantideva, the monk who gave us the exposition of the Bodhicaryavatara, The Way of the Bodhisattva. Born of his direct experience this text is the basis of our Sevenfold Puja where we ritually evoke the many qualities of the Enlightened mind.

From the talk entitled Rejoicing in Merits given at London Buddhist Centre (2019) during a six-week drop-in seminar exploring the Sevenfold Puja and the Heart Sutra.

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ratnadharini's picture
ratnadharini

Update on Next Steps, November 2019

From Adhisthana Kula on Thu, 21 Nov, 2019 - 14:08

Update on Next Steps, November 2019

From Adhisthana Kula on Thu, 21 Nov, 2019 - 14:08

Adhisthana kula update, November 2019

We’d like to update you about the next steps of the Adhisthana kula work. These next steps formed part of a “Further Response from the Adhisthana Kula to the Observer Article”, published 28th July, and are listed at the end of this update. 

On 23rd August we issued a “Message of Apology and Regret” (point 1) as well as a contextualising note “Addressing our Collective History”. Although it became clear that such an Apology...

Yogaratna's picture
Yogaratna

Extinction Rebellion as spiritual practice: some thoughts

From Buddhist Action on Wed, 20 Nov, 2019 - 15:41

Extinction Rebellion as spiritual practice: some thoughts

From Buddhist Action on Wed, 20 Nov, 2019 - 15:41

“You do not have to say anything. But, it may harm your defence if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in court. Anything you do say may be given in evidence.”  

The policeman seemed fair but firm, or firm but fair.  Not hostile, perhaps very faintly puzzled.  Civil, but watching me closely and watchful of boundaries.  Humane, but not over-friendly.  Tired.

There I was, a member of the Triratna Buddhist Order, wearing my kesa, sat meditating on...

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Responses (view all)

jayarava's picture

Thanks for this. And again, thanks for your sacrifice in putting yourself on the line in pursuit of climate justice. At this point non-violence civil disobedience seems to be the only sensible response: it has worked many times before. 

Yogaratna's picture

Thank you Jayarava.  Yes, I think if there was something like a meaningful response going on, there wouldn’t be the need for NVDA etc.  It would just be a matter of supporting the response.

bodhipaksa's picture

Thank you. I appreciate you putting yourself on the line in this way. The notion that not inconveniencing people is a higher ideal than campaigning to prevent serious damage to our planet’s ecosystem seems absurd to me.

In terms of the Buddha and social action, he said it was not an offense for a monk or nun to release animals from hunters’ traps. Legally those animals could be considered to belong to the hunters, and the monks or nuns releasing them could therefore be regarded as taking the not-given, but as long as they were acting out of compassion the Buddha was OK with it. I think this is a good example of the Buddha advocating disruptive, yet compassionate, action.

Yogaratna's picture

Thank you Bodhipaksa.  I’m sure the Buddha was interested in the systemic/cultural/conventional causes of suffering.  I don’t know about this example you quote.  Could you point me to the source?

bodhipaksa's picture

I don’t have the relevant books at hand, but a quick internet search pointed to Vin iii 62 as being the source. I remember being struck by this passage when I was researching my book on vegetarianism.

Helen - Windhorse Publications's picture
Helen - Windhor...

Windhorse Publications is looking for new books

From Windhorse Publications on Thu, 7 Nov, 2019 - 14:44

Windhorse Publications is looking for new books

From Windhorse Publications on Thu, 7 Nov, 2019 - 14:44

Do you have an idea for a new book? Are you an author with a draft Dharma manuscript that you’re looking to publish? Windhorse Publications would like to hear from you.

About Windhorse Publications

At Windhorse Publications we produce life-changing Buddhist books for all levels of involvement in the Dharma life, from the complete beginner to the experienced practitioner. We are the main publisher of Sangharakshita and we also publish Dharma books by members of the Triratna community and some practitioner-scholars outside the movement.

Our range...

Maitridevi's picture
Maitridevi

Taraloka declares an ecological emergency

From Buddhist Action on Tue, 29 Oct, 2019 - 13:14

Taraloka declares an ecological emergency

From Buddhist Action on Tue, 29 Oct, 2019 - 13:14

In October 2018 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report stated that without dramatic action we will not be able to limit global warming to a 1.5C increase. They state “Limiting global warming to 1.5°C would require rapid and far-reaching changes… at an unprecedented scale.”

In 2019 the UN Biodiversity report estimated that around one million species “already face extinction, many within decades, more than ever before in human history.”

It is clear from these reports that planet Earth is at present under severe ecological threat....

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Saccanama's picture

Sadhu sisters. Very pleased to hear you have taken this step and I will be interested in anything you learn along the way.

love,

Saccanama

Tejopala's picture

Thank you! Very encouraging to see clarity and leadership on this going on in Triratna. 

lokabandhu's picture

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lokabandhu's picture
Thank you Taraloka! May the rest of the Movement follow your lead…
sahajatara's picture

Makes me so happy …Was so disappointing and crushing when the International Council didnt agree to our proposal that we become sustainable movement like the Quakers , perhaps this will create the change that we need in Triratna xxxxxxxxxx Love Sahajatara 

Sadayasihi's picture
Sadayasihi

Triratna Young Buddhists: Transforming Through Sangha

From Triratna Young Buddhists on Sat, 26 Oct, 2019 - 17:52

“When I went on those first Young Buddhist retreats I saw a future for Buddhism in my life..”

“I don’t think I’ve ever put my phone away for an entire weekend since I was about fifteen so coming away and doing that was incredible - I didn’t realise the effect it’d had until I left…”

Suzie from Manchester and Dharmasara from Berlin talk about their involvement in the Young Buddhist project. From gaining more confidence as a...

Sadayasihi's picture
Sadayasihi

Wednesday Meditation: Above, Below, and All Around - The Four Immeasurables

From Online Meditators on Mon, 7 Oct, 2019 - 12:06

Wednesday Meditation: Above, Below, and All Around - The Four Immeasurables

From Online Meditators on Mon, 7 Oct, 2019 - 12:06

Body like a mountain, heart like an ocean, mind like the sky.” - attributed to Dōgen, 13th Century Japanese Buddhist monk and founder of the Sōtō school of Zen

The Brahma Viharas are sometimes known as the four immeasurables because the number of living beings to whom they apply is immeasurable and the benefits of practising them are immeasurable. 

The Brahma Viharas meditation consist of cultivating loving-kindness (Metta), compassion / solidarity (karuna), sympathetic joy (mudita) and equanimity (upeksha).

...

Dhivan Thomas Jones's picture
Dhivan Thomas Jones

‘Does It Float?’: Stephen Batchelor’s Secular Buddhism

From Western Buddhist Review on Sat, 5 Oct, 2019 - 17:10

‘Does It Float?’: Stephen Batchelor’s Secular Buddhism

From Western Buddhist Review on Sat, 5 Oct, 2019 - 17:10

Here we present a review of Stephen Batchelor’s two most recent books on his secular interpretation of the Dharma:

Stephen Batchelor, After Buddhism: Rethinking the Dharma for a Secular Age, Yale University Press, 2015

Stephen Batchelor, Secular Buddhism: Imagining the Dharma in an Uncertain World, Yale University Press, 2017

Review by Dhivan

Yale University Press were kind enough to send me review copies of Stephen Batchelor’s books when they were published. But reviewing them is difficult, as they are polemical, in favour of a particular new...

Sadayasihi's picture
Sadayasihi

Wednesday Meditation: Above, Below, and All Around - The Four Immeasurables

From Online Meditators on Mon, 7 Oct, 2019 - 12:06

Wednesday Meditation: Above, Below, and All Around - The Four Immeasurables

From Online Meditators on Mon, 7 Oct, 2019 - 12:06

Body like a mountain, heart like an ocean, mind like the sky.” - attributed to Dōgen, 13th Century Japanese Buddhist monk and founder of the Sōtō school of Zen

The Brahma Viharas are sometimes known as the four immeasurables because the number of living beings to whom they apply is immeasurable and the benefits of practising them are immeasurable. 

The Brahma Viharas meditation consist of cultivating loving-kindness (Metta), compassion / solidarity (karuna), sympathetic joy (mudita) and equanimity (upeksha).

...

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