Community Highlights

The Hero With A Thousand Faces: A Multimedia Event

On Wed, 26 February, 2014 - 17:05
Candradasa's picture
Candradasa
The second of our experimental videos today comes from Sam Farquharson, also in the UK. He describes the day event as “Original multi-media theatre to explore the mythic in your life.” This piece written/directed by Sam, in collaboration with writers, film-makers, actors, and musicians associated with the Triratna Buddhist movement, is the creation of a modern day myth set in Bethnal Green, in which the archetypal is exposed in our everyday world.

It will take place at the Richmix Cinema and Arts Centre, Bethnal Green, London, on March 2nd from 7.30-9pm, with an after-party till 11.30. See more details and book here.

This day is held in conjunction with the London Buddhist Centre. Proceeds will be donated to the Vajrasana appeal, the re-building of their Buddhist retreat centre in Norfolk.

More from Sam:

Steve’s not going to work in the estate agents this morning, his increasingly desperate lifestyle have left him in no fit state. But time waits on no-man, and today through twists of circumstance he is about to be thrown headlong into the Hero’s journey. A journey of conflict, loss and courage, which culminates in an expansion of what he understands his life to be about.

The common elements of Myth found across differing cultures point to something in the human psyche which responds to a level of meaning much broader and grander than we usually connect to in everyday life.

The day culminates in an original multi-media event, which combines film, live theatre and music to create a modern day myth set in Bethnal green.

Throughout the day the event will include workshops, which are divided into family and adult groups. Find out more information about the workshops taking place during the day here.

The Hero’s Journey as described by Joseph Campbell, is a root-myth found across cultures, religions and continents, which combines identifieable elements. The hero’s journey can be found in the myth of Gautama Buddha, Jesus and Moses as well as in Greek mytholgy, German folk stories (the brothers Grimm), Russian fables, Celtic/Norse legends etc. it seems to speak to something in the human psyche which responds to a level of meaning much broader and grander than that which we usually connect to in everyday life.

This evening we are led through the mythic structure of the Hero’s Journey to watch our (unwitting) hero as he passes through everyday adventures in Bethnal Green. He starts hungover in his flat but is led by twists of circumstance along a road of trials, culminating in an expansion of what he understands his life to be about.”

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