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Dharmic reasons to take part in BAM: No 2

On Sun, 17 May, 2015 - 00:49
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Munisha

In his document, Dharmic reasons to take part in BAM, (updated by Dhammadassin) Lokabandhu writes:

“2015 could just be the year the world gets serious about the danger of climate change. For years the world’s scientists have been warning that we are on the verge of creating planet-wide runaway climate change - but the world’s response has been pretty apathetic.

It is becoming ever clearer that we will have to ‘go forth’ from our present habit of unchchecked fossil fuel exploitation: the IPCC’s ‘Fifth Assessment Report’ stated categorically that many, even most, will have to stay unmined in the ground if we are to avoid global climate disaster.

Not surprisingly perhaps, we have recently started to see the emergence of more strident  ‘climate change deniers’ in America, Canada, and the US, as vested interests become more directly threatened. Other voices urgently need to make themselves heard.

Buddhism could - or should - have a great deal to offer this debate, for instance offering its understanding that actions have consequences, its teaching that ever-increasing material consumption does not bring ever-increasing happiness, and not least, its recognition that ignorance really is wilful.

To date, however, Buddhists, including Triratna Buddhists, have barely referred to the issue let alone focussed on it. But we have so much to offer…

A Buddhist voice
A good place to start may be a short summary of our strengths and limitations as Buddhists.

What we’re not We aren’t likely to be high up in politics, at the cutting-edge of technological developments, or at the forefront of direct action…
What we are But we are committed to practising ethics, compassion and awareness, willing and able to take personal responsibility for our actions, exemplars that a simple life equals a happy life, understanding that actions have consequences, that “with our thoughts we make the world.” We’re also able to recognise our own attachments and to confess and ‘go forth’ from them when needed.

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